The UN & Music Collective Playing For Change Releases New Video, "A Better Place" in Uniting For Human Rights

UN, World Musicians Unite For
Human Rights

 
The United Nations and world music collective Playing For Change, have joined forces on a new "Around the World" video for their original song, "A Better Place." Mashable premiered the video to mark International Human Rights Day. It features 29 musicians from thirteen countries – including Mountaga Sissoko of Mali, Naprang Manator of Thailand, and Papa Orbe of Cuba - performing the song in their native country, speaking out against inequality and for social justice with one united voice.



The Playing For Change project brings together under recognized musicians from around the world with the self-described goal to "inspire, connect, and bring peace to the world through music." They first garnered attention with their video for "Stand By Me," which has since received more than 46 million views (watch here).

"A Better Place” was commissioned by the United Nations Millennium Development Goals Achievement Fund (UNMDGAF) to draw attention to issues of social and economic inequalities based on race, religion, ethnicity, gender, and even location. UNMDGAF is the largest global fund that supports the implementations of the Millennium Development Goals. These goals are agreed upon by all nations and focus on reducing poverty and hunger, achieving health and education for all, attaining gender equality and ensuring environmental sustainability and the halt of spreading disease (www.mdgfund.org).

In their fight to shine a light on issues of social and economic inequalities, Playing For Change and the UNMDGAF are encouraging people to share the video on social media using the hashtag #ABetterPlace.

http://abetterplace.mdgfund.org
http://playingforchange.com
http://www.mdgfund.org
http://www.youtube.com/user/PlayingForChange

 

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